Showing 4 ideas for tag "occupation"

AoU Research Priorities Use Cases

How much do occupational exposures contribute to the burden of chronic disease (e.g., cancer, CVD) in U.S. adults?

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Most of us spend a lot of time at work. Workplace physical and chemical hazards as well as organizational attributes of the job can have a profound impact on health. While work-related acute injuries and illnesses may be easy to recognize, the effects of work on chronic disease are more difficult to assess. Collecting occupational history and exposure information from the All of Us cohort will help us better understand... more »

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AoU Research Priorities Use Cases

How do contract and contingent (temporary) work arrangements affect worker health?

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More than 90% of all job growth in the US from 2005-2015 occurred in “alternative work arrangements” (e.g., part-time or contract work). This has provided flexible employment opportunities, but negative effects on health. AoU could look at how contract and contingent workers cope with job insecurity, lack of health and retirement benefits, and absence of job safety policies and training, and how these affect mental health,... more »

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Do work conditions underlie disparities in maternal mortality, preterm birth, and breastfeeding?

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Over half of U.S. births occur to working women. A woman’s job dictates her ability to take leave for prenatal and postnatal care, to remain off work after the birth to heal and care for the baby, and to continue to breastfeed her baby through the first year of life. The All of Us study will allow researchers to determine what workplace factors are strengths and barriers to optimal health for both mother and baby, and... more »

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Is there a relationship between work-related injuries and opioid use (in either direction)?

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Workers in certain occupations might be more likely to use opioids if their first introduction to opioids follows a workplace illness or injury. Some of those same workers may abuse the drugs due to stressors at work. Also, workers using opioids might be more likely to injure themselves at work if they are less sensitive to pain and might be slower to react or less likely to notice dangerous workplace conditions. AoU... more »

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